Friday, August 23, 2013

CKK #45 Results


1. None of the comments during the kukai are from the kukai coordinator. Comments and votes of the players are anonymously stated
2. Poems remain the copyright of individual writers

Players: 1. Bill Kenney, US; 2. Cristina-Monica Moldoveanu, Romania; 3. Vinay Leo R.Bangalore, India; 4. Keith A. Simmonds T & T; 5. Ramesh Anand, India; 6. Pravat Kumar, India; 7. Ralf Bröker, Germany; 8. Gheorghe Postelnicu, Romania; 9. Kashinath Karmakar, India; 10. Paresh Tiwari, India; 11. Angie Werren, USA; 12. Pat Geyer, USA; 13. Arvinder kaur, India; 14. Anitha Varma, India; 15. Jayashree Maniyil, Australia; 16. John McDonald, Scotland; 17 . Sanjuktaa Asopa,
India 18. Irena Szewczyk, Poland; 19. Claudius Gottstein, Germany; 20. Cezar-Florin Ciobîca, Romania; 21. Tatjana Debeljacki, Serbia; 22. Robert Kania, Poland


FIRST PLACE

11
migrating birds --
all the colors of
my skin
--Angie Werren, Amelia, Ohio USA
Votes: 533*** Points: 20
Comments: A superb haiku that actually transcends the "Afro-centric" category, even while acknowledging it.


SECOND PLACE

18
visit to a zoo
she hides her bracelets
of ivory
--Irena Szewczyk
Votes: 433*** Points: 19
Comments:


THIRD PLACE

9
fancy dress day-
today my child is
nelson mandela
--kashinath karmakar(kash poet),Durgapur,India
Votes: 72**** Points: 11
Comments: More than another "cute child" ku, this resonates, without inflated rhetoric, with hope for the future.


15
reunion –
only my cousins
speak Swahili
--Jayashree Maniyil, Melbourne, Australia
Votes: 72**** Points: 11
Comments: The everlasting mystery of the one and the many, within a family, within a group, within a culture; where, exactly, is the union in this reunion?



RESULTS CONTINUES

1
African-American
the long journey
from home to home
--Bill Kenney
Votes: 62**** Points: 10
Comments:



2
ivory trade ban -
upon new piano keys
"Lord Bless Africa"
--Cristina-Monica Moldoveanu, Romania
Votes: 3***** Points: 03
Comments:



3
soul sisters. . .
their colors forgotten
as they paint
--Vinay Leo R.Bangalore, India
Votes: 2***** Points: 02
Comments:



4
rastafari...
a river of peace
down freedom road
--Keith A. SimmondsT & T
Votes: 11**** Points: 03
Comments:



5
abandoned fort
the traces of its culture
in my beats
--Ramesh Anand Bangalore, India
Votes: *1**** Points: 02
Comments:



6
fruit laden tree--
the earthly fragrance
rooted in Africa
--Pravat Kumar Padhy, India
Votes: *2**** Points: 04
Comments:



7
visiting
Wittenberg
I have a dream
--Ralf Bröker
Votes: 41**** Points: 06
Comments: I wish I could give 3 points for multiple layers of meaning but so many excellent and intelligent haiku here (“Intelligence plus character…”)



8
Center of the WORLD -
when continents only ONE
should've been somewhere
--STOPS
Votes: ****** Points: 00
Comments:



10
sunset boat -
rounding the vivid wake
of calypso beats
--Paresh Tiwari, India
Votes: 32**** Points: 07
Comments:



12
in a brier patch
spider and rabbit spin tales
threading old to new
--Pat
Votes: ****** Points: 00
Comments:
Note: I loved the information so I based my ku on it. "Anansi the trickster is a West African God. He often takes the shape of a spider and is considered to be the god of all knowledge of stories. He is also one of the most important characters of West African and Caribbean folklore...(read the rest of this note at Comments)



13
lovemaking--
the heaving rain forest
beside the Congo
--Arvinder kaur,Chandigarh,India
Votes: 211*** Points: 07
Comments:



14
continent
dark with mystery-
throbbing drums
--Anitha Varma, Kerala, India
Votes: 42**** Points: 08
Comments:



16
walking tall
the cane cutter's daughter
...once barefoot
--John McDonald EDINBURGH SCOTLAND
Votes: *2**** Points: 04
Comments:



17
Rum and Coca- cola-
colors deepen in
an African dusk
--sanjuktaa
Votes: 2***** Points: 02
Comments:
Note: Rum and coca cola is a very old song I remember from my childhood. A friend's father, who was
in army, had this in his collection. I googled and dug out this song as i thought it fits with the theme and while being cheery on the surface, hints at something deeper on another level...(read the rest at Comments)



19
thistlefield
first day at highschool
wearing a Kanga
--Claudius Gottstein Borgloh, Germany
Votes: 12**** Points: 05
Comments:



20
on Kwanzaa -
opening again the book
,,To kill a mockingbird"
--Cezar-Florin Ciobîca
Votes: 3***** Points: 03
Comments:



21
Afrocentric book
variegrated colours and
a butterfly resting
--Tatjana Debeljacki
Votes: 2***** Points: 02
Comments:



22
blues
far away from home
close to your heart
--Robert Kania, Poland
Votes: 11**** Points: 03
Comments:

4 comments:

  1. CKK welcomes: Anitha Varma, Claudius Gottstein, Pravat Kumar, Ramesh Anand, . To view our very first kukai CLICK
    HERE


    Thanks to all participants for making CKK#45 a success

    much love
    gillena cox; founder/co-ordinator Caribbean Kigo Kukai

    ReplyDelete
  2. PAT GEYER'S NOTE:
    I loved the information so I based my ku on it. "Anansi the trickster is a West African God. He often takes the shape of a spider and is considered to be the god of all knowledge of stories. He is also one of the most important characters of West African and Caribbean folklore. Anansi shares similarities with the trickster figure of Brer Rabbit, who originated from the folklore of the Bantu-speaking peoples of south and central Africa. Enslaved Africans brought the Brer Rabbit tales to the New World, which, like the Anansi stories, depict a physically small and vulnerable creature
    using his cunning intelligence to prevail over larger animals. However, although Brer Rabbit stories are told in the

    Caribbean, especially in the French-speaking islands (where he is named “Compair Lapin”), he is predominantly an

    African American folk hero. His tales entered the mainstream through the work of the white American journalist Joel

    Chandler Harris, who wrote several collections of Uncle Remus stories between 1870 and 1906. In the USA today, the

    stories of Br'er Rabbit exist alongside other stories of Anansi himself, coming from both the times of slavery and also

    from the Caribbean and directly from Africa."

    ReplyDelete
  3. SANJUKTA ASOPA'S NOTE:
    Rum and coca cola is a very old song I remember from my childhood. A friend's father, who was in army, had this in his collection. I googled and dug out this song as i thought it fits with the theme and while being
    cheery on the surface, hints at something deeper on another level.I have provided the links below for those who might
    not have heard it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rum_and_Coca-Cola>




    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you, Gillena. I got some fine comments on my haiku, but I am just here to say, that we again shared ckk on Haiku from German Tongues: http://haikufromgermantongues.blogspot.de/2013/09/a-wonderful-collection.html

    Best regards
    Ralf

    ReplyDelete